Tiagabine hydrochloride

CAS No.: 145821-59-6 We also offer S-Isomer and Racemic Tiagabine for analysis purpose, our min order is 50mg, for price, please contact us directly. Request for quotation

About Tiagabine Hcl

What is the most important information I should know about tiagabine?
Do not stop taking tiagabine without first talking to your doctor, even if you feel better. It is important to continue taking tiagabine to prevent the seizures from recurring. Stopping tiagabine suddenly may result in increased seizure frequency. If the medication needs to be stopped, your doctor may need to lower the dosage gradually.
Carry or wear a medical identification tag to let others know that you are taking this medicine in the case of an emergency.
Tiagabine may cause drowsiness, dizziness, decreased concentration, vision problems, or poor coordination. Do not drive, operate dangerous machinery, or perform other hazardous activities until you know how tiagabine affects you. If you experience drowsiness, dizziness, decreased concentration, vision problems, or poor coordination, avoid these activities.

What is tiagabine?
The exact way that tiagabine works is unknown. However, it is believed that it alters chemical impulses in the brain that cause seizures.
Tiagabine is used to control seizures.
Tiagabine may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking tiagabine?
Before taking tiagabine, tell your doctor if you have liver disease. You may not be able to take this medication, or you may need a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment.
Tiagabine is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether tiagabine will be harmful to an unborn baby. Do not take tiagabine without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant or could become pregnant.
It is not known whether tiagabine passes into breast milk. Do not take tiagabine without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take tiagabine?
Take tiagabine exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.
Take each dose of tiagabine with a full glass of water.
Take tiagabine with food.
It is important to take tiagabine regularly to get the most benefit.
Do not stop taking tiagabine without first talking to your doctor, even if you feel better. It is important to continue taking tiagabine to prevent the seizures from recurring. Stopping tiagabine suddenly may result in increased seizure frequency. If the medication needs to be stopped, your doctor may need to lower the dosage gradually.
If treatment with tiagabine is stopped for any reason, contact your doctor before restarting the medication. A lower dose may be needed to prevent side effects from occurring.
Your doctor may want you to have blood tests or other medical evaluations during treatment with tiagabine to monitor progress and side effects.
Carry or wear a medical identification tag to let others know that you are taking this medicine in the case of an emergency.
Store tiagabine at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?
Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the dose you missed and take only the next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.

What happens if I overdose?
Seek emergency medical treatment if an overdose is suspected.
Symptoms of a tiagabine overdose include drowsiness, slurred speech, poor coordination, confusion, and agitation.

What should I avoid while taking tiagabine?
Tiagabine may cause drowsiness, dizziness, decreased concentration, vision problems, or poor coordination. Do not drive, operate dangerous machinery, or perform other hazardous activities until you know how tiagabine affects you. If you experience drowsiness, dizziness, decreased concentration, vision problems, or poor coordination, avoid these activities.
Do not drink alcohol while taking tiagabine. Alcohol may increase drowsiness or dizziness caused by tiagabine. Alcohol may also increase the risk of seizures.

What are the possible side effects of tiagabine?
If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking tiagabine and seek emergency medical attention or contact your doctor immediately:
· an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat; swelling of the lips, tongue, or face; or hives);
· increasing frequency or worsening of seizures;
· irregular back-and-forth movements of the eyes (nystagmus);
· weakness; or
· rash.
Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take tiagabine and talk to your doctor if you experience
· dizziness, poor coordination, or drowsiness;
· nausea and vomiting;
· agitation or nervousness; or
· tremor.
Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

What other drugs will affect tiagabine?
Tiagabine interacts with many of the other drugs used to treat seizures. Before taking tiagabine, tell your doctor about all other medications you are taking. You may require a dosage adjustment or special monitoring during treatment if you are taking a combination of medications to treat seizures. Continue to take all medications prescribed to treat seizures exactly as directed.
Tiagabine may increase the effects of other drugs that cause drowsiness, including antidepressants, alcohol, antihistamines, sedatives (used to treat insomnia), pain relievers, anxiety medicines, and muscle relaxants. Do not take other medications that may increase drowsiness without first talking to your doctor.
Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with tiagabine or affect your condition. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including herbal products.

Attation:

Our tiagabine (Gabitril) can not used in human directly. Our tiagabine can be use in research purpose and pharmaceutical line.

Technology discussion:

How to Separate the S(+) and R(-)-enantiomers of tiagabine.HCl and its two chiral precursors by chiral chromatography: application to chiral inversion studies. Following is the detail.

Chiral HPLC methods were developed and validated for tiagabine.HCl and its two chiral precursors to determine the chiral purity of the three compounds to ensure the quality of the final product which is used as a new antiepileptic drug. Tiagabine.HCl was derivatized with 1-napthalenemethylamine and was chromatographed on a Pirkle type phenyl glycine column with a mobile phase of 69:31, 0.1 M ammonium acetateacetonitrile (v/v). The two chiral precursors were chromatographed on a Chiralcel-OG column with a mobile phase of hexane, isopropanol etc. Each of the three HPLC methods have a selectivity factor (@a) of 1-2 or higher. The validation of the methods was done by conducting standard addition and recovery studies of the S(+)-enantiomers in the samples. The %RSD of all three methods were <5 with a limit of quantification of 0.05% (peak area) or lower. By using these methods, a study was conducted to investigate the effect of pH, temperature, and trace levels of transition metals such as Fe^3^+, Co^2^+, and Ni^2^+ on the conversion of R(-)-enantiomer to the S(+)-enantiomer of tiagabine.HCl and its two chiral precursors. The results of this study demonstrated that the two chiral precursors of tiagabine.HCl under reflux conditions are more sensitive to chiral inversion than tiagabine.HCl. Under reflux conditions, in the presence of trace metal ions and different pH, approximately 10, 11, and 1% of the R(-)-enantiomer was converted to the S(+)-enantiomer for ethyl nipecotate, ethylester of tiagabine, and tiagabine.HCl, respectively. However, at room temperature, tiagabine.HCl appears to be less chirally stable than its two chiral precursors. Approximately 0.4% R(-)-enantiomer of tiagabine.HCl was converted to the S(+)-enantiomer at room temperature and acidic conditions. Under similar conditions, the S(+)-enantiomer of ethyl nipecotate and ethylester of tiagabine.HCl was <0.05%. The initial S(+)-enantiomer content for all three compounds was <0.1%.

Tiagabine hydrochloride Specification

Appearance White to off-white crystalline powder   Standard Packing 50g/bag or per customer request
Purity (HPLC) ≥ 98%   Inventory Normally we have Tiagabine hydrochloride in stock
Optical rotation [α]D25= -9.80 ~ -10.80 (c=1, H2O)    
Melting point 190.0 °C - 200.0 °C   Tiagabine hydrochloride physical parameters
Loss on drying < 6%   CAS No: 145821-59-6
Residue on ignition < 0.2%   Formula C20H25NO2S2 ·HCl
Heavy metals < 2ppm   Molecular Weight 412.01
Acetone < 5000 ppm   Synonym (3R)-1-[4,4-Bis(3-methyl-2-thienyl)-3-butenyl]-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride
      Solubility Soluble to 50 mM in water and to 100 mM in DMSO
      Structure Tiagabine hydrochloride
       
       
       
         
Certificate of Analysis Tiagabine hydrochloride COA      
Literature Tiagabine hydrochloride literature      
MSDS Tiagabine hydrochloride MSDS      
         
References: (The papers which used our material)
1. Y. Xu et al: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 361 (2007) 499–504 Homeostatic plasticity of GABAergic synaptic transmission in mice lacking GAT1 Full text
2. Xu et al: Journal of Neuroscience Research 86:465–470 (2008) Hypoalgesia in Mice Lacking GABA Transporter Subtype 1 Full text
3. McDonald et al: Psychopharmacology (2008) 197:591–600 Discriminative stimulus effects of tiagabine and related GABAergic drugs in rats Full text
4. Masuda et al.: Neurobiol Dis. 2008 June ; 30(3): 293–302 Tiagabine is neuroprotective in the N171-82Q and R6/2 mouse models of Huntington's disease Full text
 
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Tiagabine hydrochloride